Older People Living with Cancer

Peer advocates supporting older people affected by cancer

Advocates in Integrated Care: making a difference..

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Sam Bond, Service Manager at The Macmillan Impetus Cancer Advocacy Service in Brighton & Hove, explains why advocacy can make a real difference

“The use of health and social care by people with cancer” a 2014 study commissioned by The Department of Health, shows a clear link between cancer diagnosis and use of social care.  The report explains “For some social care is critical to their independence and ability to participate in society.”  However, use of social care by people with cancer is not equivalent to use of social care by people with other chronic conditions. A report by Macmillan in 2010 ‘Cancer should be as much a social concern as it is a health priority’, found that statutory social care was not meeting the needs of people with cancer. ‘People were often not referred for an assessment and did not know about the types of services which may be available. The research also found that those who commissioned social care services had limited understanding of the specific needs of people affected by cancer.

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However, recent updates to legislation aim to transform the delivery of health and social care. The Care Act now places a duty on local authorities to work more closely with health services in order to promote the wellbeing of adults and improve the quality of care they receive. The Care Act espouses core values of ‘wellbeing’ alongside ‘whole person’ care, promoting independence. It extends the right for eligible people to access independent advocacy so that they can be involved in social care assessment and safeguarding processes. But what about advocacy support for people to be involved in integrated health and social care processes? What will ‘whole person’ care look like for people affected by cancer? My understanding is that it must be based on the needs of the individual and their particular circumstances.

Cancer advocacy services, born of a collaboration between Macmillan Cancer Support and The Older People’s Advocacy Alliance, are responsive to people affected by cancer and their individual circumstances. The trained advocates, professional advocates and peer advocates with their own experiences of cancer, have time to build a relationship of trust with the client, listening and finding out what’s important to that individual (‘the whole person’).

When I started my role as Service Manager at The Macmillan Impetus Cancer Advocacy Service in Brighton & Hove, I had some concerns that health and social care professionals might view advocates warily. However, my experience so far, is that health and social care professionals welcome the opportunity to have the involvement of an advocate to support their clients.

Sam Bond

Sam Bond

I found a recent conversation with a health professional quite revealing on this matter. He told me that the hospital where he worked had had an experience where some paid carers accompanying clients to appointments sometimes behaved in an adversarial and accusing manner towards health professionals. He said he had found that particular carers sometimes had their own agendas when they accompanied patients to appointments. This caused the health workers felt defensive and sadly the patient’s wishes were getting lost in the middle of all of this.

Having worked as a paid carer myself for a number of years, it is not my view that paid carers generally act in an accusing way. However, this example does emphasise the value of properly trained advocates.  An advocate’s only concern is to represent the wishes of the person instructing them. Advocacy is certainly NOT about accompanying a client to an appointment equipped with a detective’s notebook and a suspicious frown! Of course advocates can and must raise concerns regarding the quality of care if clients wish them to. But this is just a fraction of what advocates do.

An advocate can extend the support that health and social care professionals are able to offer. For example, Cancer Advocates can provide support by helping people to prepare questions for appointments in order that the person can make the best use of time with a clinician, as well as attending alongside the person. Advocates can ensure the person understands, gathering information and explaining information that might not be clear or requesting clarification. They can write information down for the person, and/or talk through the information again later on. Advocates do not give advice but help ensure clients can access information and consider its implications in relation to their particular circumstances, so that they are able to make informed choices. The benefit of Advocacy is that the advocate is instructed by the person.  This puts the person in control at a time when they may feel that they don’t have much control over the cancer, the treatment, the side effects, or their life.

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Clients often say they are concerned about who will be their point of contact. There may be a number of different health and social care workers involved, which can be confusing for people. For a person affected by cancer an advocate can be a consistent person alongside them helping to access services, and navigate the health and social care system. An advocate can be an asset in assisting good communication between client and health and social care providers and between the professionals and client. An advocate can ensure the person’s views are represented, helping the client to get the most out of health and social care and promoting the client’s independence. Cancer advocates are great examples of the way in which advocacy support complements the work of both health and social care professionals.

Sam Bond 

Phone: 01273 737888, Email: Cancer Advocacy@bh-impetus.org

 

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Author: Marie McWilliams

OPAAL's National Development Officer

5 thoughts on “Advocates in Integrated Care: making a difference..

  1. Pingback: Advocates in Integrated Care: making a difference.. | Oxfordshire Advocacy

  2. Hi Sam,

    Great to hear that you’ve had such a positive response from health professionals. As a volunteer peer advocate this had also been a concern of mine originally. However, I have also had good experiences with the health professionals I have come into contact with when accompanying my partners. They have been very welcoming and appreciative of how advocacy supported their patient.

    I really liked your article, it clearly explained the advocacy role and the benefits it can bring to someone affected by cancer. Of course this could also include a carer, member of the family or close friend as well as a patient.

    Best regards,

    Bob Smith
    Volunteer Peer Cancer Advocate
    Dorset MacMillan Advocacy

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  3. Hi Sam (and Bob),

    It was interesting to read about the advocacy service that exists, but I wondered if it exists in all areas?

    I also wondered how people who might need an advocate could be referred and who could do it? I’m thinking of some older men who I’ve met at support groups who I’ve thought were struggling to get the practical help and support they need, help that most of us who attend support groups because we have cancer or are supporting someone with cancer are not able to give ourselves.

    Jim

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    • Hi Jim
      The service isn’t available in all areas and that’s something that we’re keen to strive towards. Funding is obviously the big issue.
      Where we do run a service the person affected by cancer can refer themselves or, with their permission, they can be referred by anyone else including health and social care professionals.
      You can find a list of the areas we currently do cover in the “About us” page, click top right on the blog.
      Kind Regards
      Marie (OPAAL)

      Like

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