Older People Living with Cancer

Peer advocates supporting older people affected by cancer

Poor old Guy and his fellow conspirators would have had no need to resort to gunpowder had they had the right to free speech, freedom of thought, religion and belief, and the prohibition of torture and inhuman treatment.

1 Comment

Ahead of November 5th, we have a really thought provoking post from Rhonda Oliver of Barnet Macmillan Cancer Advocacy Service (Advocacy in Barnet). We hope you enjoy it as much as we did:

 

guy-fawkes

 

Remember, remember, the fifth of November

Gunpowder treason and plot

We see no reason why gunpowder treason should ever be forgot!

The fireworks are already starting near me as a prelude to the gruesome Guy Fawkes’ Day commemoration (or it could be the happier celebration of Diwali) and I tried to remember what I knew about the Gunpowder Plot. Guy Fawkes and several other conspirators plotted to blow up the Houses of Parliament to protest against the poor treatment and oppression of Catholics under the reign of King James I (James VI of Scotland) 1566-1625.

This made me think of the Human Rights Act – like you would – and its protections. Poor old Guy and his fellow conspirators  would have had no need to resort to gunpowder had they had the right to free speech, freedom of thought, religion and belief, and the prohibition of torture and inhuman treatment.

Rhonda Oliver

Rhonda Oliver

 

My grasshopper brain then leapt to the Brexiteers’ proposed “British Bill of Rights and Responsibilities” and I wondered how this might impact on advocacy – if at all?

We have had cause to consider invoking the Act in a case where someone was being pressured into leaving their home by the local authority under the “Respect for privacy and family life” provisions. In the end, sanity prevailed and the person was supported by their advocate to stay at home. I wonder whether any other Advocacy groups have had cause to use the Act to ensure that public organisations (including Government, the Police and local councils) treat everyone equally with fairness, dignity and respect? It would be great to hear about them.

We must hope that any new bill would not weaken everyone’s rights by leaving politicians of whatever stripe to decide when fundamental freedoms should apply.

 

So, holler boys, holler boys, Let the bells ring.

Holler boys, holler boys, God save the king.

 

And what shall we do with him?

Burn him!

Have you had cause to use The Human Rights Act in your advocacy practice? If so, do let us know and join the conversation.

Rhonda Oliver, Barnet Macmillan Cancer Advocacy Service 

Advertisements

Author: Marie McWilliams

OPAAL's National Development Officer

One thought on “Poor old Guy and his fellow conspirators would have had no need to resort to gunpowder had they had the right to free speech, freedom of thought, religion and belief, and the prohibition of torture and inhuman treatment.

  1. Hi Marie

    Just wanted to say how powerful I think this blog is and how it will hopefully give cause to us all to think more about the use of the Human Rights Act in our advocacy work.

    Dorothy

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s